Tag Archives: freedom

Independence vs. Freedom

Let us never forget the sacrifices made.

Let us never forget the sacrifices made.

Is there a difference between independence and freedom? Our nation fought for independence from a ruling body that allowed us no representation, as well as for the freedom to worship God freely without government interference. Like the relationship between a child and a parent, independence comes with maturity and doesn’t mean ties are completely severed. It means we have become responsible enough that we no longer depend on them to survive. I think freedom has more to do with ruling ourselves and making our own choices, while independence has more to do with being responsible and not dependent.  Similar, but different.  Both come with responsibility and consequences.  In either case, exchanges and sacrifices are made in order to obtain and maintain freedom and independence. Neither is free, so let us never forget the sacrifices that have been made and are still being made today to keep both!

Happy Independence Day!!!

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Wisdom Wednesday: Freedom

Wisdom Wednesday: Freedom


Happiness Isn’t Free

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A recent conversation with a friend about being happy reminded me of a quote I had saved years ago, because I thought it was so profound.

“To be free to sail the seven seas, you must make yourself a slave to the compass.  Every freedom has a corresponding slavery.  We can be free from the toothbrush and a slave to cavities or a slave to the toothbrush and free from cavities.  For everything we want, we must give up something else.” —Quiet Walk Daily e-Devotional

Just as freedom isn’t free, happiness isn’t free either.  Sometimes sacrifices must be made in order to obtain both freedom and true happiness.  Oftentimes we have to give up one thing in order to have what we ultimately want.  Is it worth it?  Sometimes it’s not a matter of having to give up one thing entirely in order to have another, but it may just be a matter of moderation and setting boundaries.  Both moderation and boundaries have to be maintained, and that takes both time and energy, so it’s still a trade-off.   As my friend, Scott, would ask, “How badly do you want it, and what are you prepared to do?”

“The price of freedom is eternal vigilance.” —Thomas Jefferson

 

If you liked this, you might also like… Wisdom Wednesday: Freedom

Photo credit:  Luca Zaninoni - www.sxc.hu/photo/1330210


Happy Fourth of July

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Wisdom Wednesday: Freedom

Photo credit:  Luca Zaninoni - www.sxc.hu/photo/1330210

Photo credit: Luca Zaninoni – http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1330210

Have you ever gained freedom from one thing only to rush into something else and found yourself bound again or wishing you could go back? A couple of days ago as I had just finished grocery shopping and was going to pick up my daughter from an appointment, I watched a little dog with a red collar running and bounding through the strip mall parking lot. It appeared to have escaped from a parked car and was simply ecstatic to be free. As I prepared to park my car and try to rescue the dog, I watched it jump into some tall grass that swallowed it up. Not far from the edge of the tall grass was a river, and I was afraid the dog might unsuspectingly jump into it. The dog seemed to have no sense of potential danger, only that it was free. What if it had fallen into the river or gotten lost or hit by a car? Would it have regretted its momentary lapse of restraint for a brief run in the sun? Was it truly free?

2 Peter 2:19b says, “…by what a man is overcome, by this he is enslaved,” which according to the context is his own desires. The dog was enslaved by its intense desire to run free. Its desire seemed to be more in control than the dog itself.

“No one is free who is a slave to the body.” —Latin proverb

“…use not liberty for an occasion to the flesh, but by love serve one another.” —Galatians 5:13b

I am so glad for the boundaries my loving, heavenly Father has set for me, and that He didn’t set me free to pursue things I’d begged for only to realize later how enslaving or harmful they would have been. It reminds me of the time my daughter’s dog escaped the house to run after a UPS truck and into a main road. What did she think she was gonna do with it once she caught it? I’m so glad she wasn’t hit by a car, but I couldn’t help but think of my beloved German shepherd I’d had that was free to be outside with us without a leash as well as by herself, because she knew to stay within the boundaries where it was safe and she was loved.

“To be free to sail the seven seas, you must make yourself a slave to the compass. Every freedom has a corresponding slavery. We can be free from the toothbrush and a slave to cavities or a slave to the toothbrush and free from cavities. For everything we want, we must give up something else.” – from Quiet Walk Daily e-Devotional

“We must accept responsibility in order to have true liberty.” –Ken Davis, Christian comedian


Clean Slate, New Operating System

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“Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new.” —2 Cor. 5:17

“Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new.”  —2 Cor. 5:17

Have you ever wondered why, if old things are passed away and all things are become new, and you’re supposedly this new creature, it doesn’t seem true?  Although I have heard bits and pieces of what it means, I asked the Lord if He could give me an analogy to better understand and explain it.  I believe He gave me two… even three.

The first analogy is a clean slate.  When we accept Christ as Lord and Savior, it doesn’t matter what we’ve done in the past, all those old things are passed away.  There is no sin too great that Christ’s sacrifice doesn’t cover it.  It’s like having your slate wiped clean.  It’s like having the prison doors opened and getting a new identity— in Christ, without any stigma of who we were or what we did before.  All things are become new to us.

Ok, so you might ask, “If I’m a new creature, why do I sometimes still act like the old me?”  So the second analogy is a computer.  Since my computer knowledge is limited, I asked my son, Chris, to help me with the analogy.  When we confess Christ as Lord and Savior (Romans 10:9), it’s like he gives us a new operating system, an upgrade.  He doesn’t replace the hardware and erase our memory or who we are, He gives us a new operating system, but we retain the same applications and files.  Being a MacGirl I know that some system upgrades make some programs and applications obsolete, and they simply won’t work as well or not at all with the new operating system, because it processes things differently.  Let me give you another analogy.  If you used to be a professional thief before you accepted Christ, you’d still have the capability and talent to steal after you accept Christ, but the way you process opportunities will change.  While a part of you might be tempted to steal given the opportunity, your new spirit with new affections and desires processes or thinks about those opportunities differently.  And even if you do give into the temptation to steal, it won’t feel quite the same, and eventually, as the Lord gently purges out the old programs and applications, learned behaviors and sinful desires, you’ll discover new ways of using your skills for good instead of evil.  You are a new creature, because you have been given the Holy Spirit (1 John 4:13), the upgrade, but some of your other programming still needs to be upgraded as well.

When we accept Christ as Savior, not only do we get a clean slate and a new operating system, but because of God’s amazing grace and love expressed through Christ’s perfect sacrifice, our slates remain forever clean (Hebrews 10:14).  Isn’t that great news?


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